Saturday, 23 February 2019

Geeta Pendse interviews our artistic director Ben Spiller and associate artist Shane Gabriel about Shakespeare, life, music and our new show Queer Lady M.

TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW

Geeta: I’m Geeta Pendse. Now, in the next hour we will be chatting about a man that you probably know a little bit about – Shakespeare, arguably the most famous British writer of all time. But for some, the language of the Bard can feel inaccessible and maybe intimidating. Well, one theatre company based in the East Midlands and performing in Leicestershire is trying to change that. 1623 theatre company has put on shows in venues ranging from a cave to a shopping centre, and they’re passionate about bringing the words and ideas of Shakespeare to different audiences. The theatre company is currently developing a show called Queer Lady M, which is inspired by Shakespeare’s Lady Macbeth and it delves into a range of modern themes. Well, with me is Shane Gabriel, who is the actor playing Lady M. Hello! And Ben Spiller, who is the artistic director of 1623.How are you both doing tonight?
 
Ben: Really well, thank you Geeta.
 
Geeta: Thank you for coming in. I know it’s your first time on the show. So, your tagline with 1623, Ben, is ‘see Shakespeare differently’. Why is Shakespeare still relevant?
 
Ben: Well, it’s the ideas, the themes, it’s the characters, it’s the relationships. Shakespeare really taps into those big ideas about what it means to be a human being, really, in all of its glory and all the things to be celebrated and excited about, and the things that sometimes tie us up in knots and that we try and undo – sometimes we do it well and sometimes we don’t. And the beautiful language as well, and the rhythm of the language, and the way that these stories translate into so many different languages and fit into lots of different cultures. There are all sorts of different adaptations and interpretations of Shakespeare all over the world.
 
Geeta: I mean, I mentioned that sometimes Shakespeare can feel intimidating. I do know people who perhaps, you know, had boring lessons at school and as a result, you know, didn’t want to give it a go. And also the language itself – I remember a teacher saying to me Shakespeare should be seen performed. To read it on a page sometimes can make it, you know, challenging. What do you think, Shane? Have you always loved Shakespeare?
 
Shane: Yeah, yeah. I mean, as Ben was saying, he’s a great humanitarian and, as you mentioned yourself, really Shakespeare should be performed. He wrote plays, he didn’t write novels. It should be see in its entirety of performance hopefully. As lovely as it is just to sit and read some Shakespeare, it is great to see it visually – especially for me, I work very visually; so I think that is how it should be.
 
Geeta: Did you feel from a young age, though, you could connect with Shakespeare?
 
Shane: Yeah, when I was 9 my grandmother always used to play videos – because I grew up with my grandparents – and she used to play a video after school, kind of give me some toast and tea and kind of keep me quiet, I suppose, while she was making dinner. And one day she played an animated version of Macbeth.
 
Geeta: Oh wow!
 
Shane: And there was just something about it. I couldn’t really explain what it was or how it was or what the connection was. There was just something there that kind of drew me in to this world. And then from there I read more Shakespeare, saw more Shakespeare and yeah, so, I don’t know, it’s really hard to pin point and it’s kind of one of the things in our show is like what is it that speaks to me in that.
 
Geeta: That’s so interesting, because you play the title role in Queer Lady M and we’re going to be chatting about the show inspired by Macbeth, specifically Lady Macbeth. Were you always into Shakespeare, Ben, or is it something that grew?
 
Ben: Yeah, it started at school really. I had three amazing teachers, two Drama teachers and an English Literature teacher, and they loved this stuff. They were so passionate about it. They went to see lots of performances, they took us to see lots of different performances. We had workshops. And I really couldn’t understand why people were getting so knotted up about it all because it was this really exciting thing. Yeah, I didn’t understand what all the words meant but that kind of didn’t matter because there’s the rest of your life to work it out. You know, it’s not a short-term thing. If you let Shakespeare sort of mature with you, it kind of stays with you a little bit and you can revisit the plays later in life and see them from a different perspective, because you’ve got those different life experiences and you can bring that to your understanding of what the plays are about.
 
Geeta: Ben, I’ve never ever thought about it like that before. But that is so true because when you study it often you’re 13 to 16 or in that teenage period and there are lots of young people who are incredibly wise, but I was not one of them, and there were these big themes that on some level I connected with but as you get older – to be or not to be, all these incredible – you know, King Lear and his daughters, and aging, and there’s so many different themes aren’t there actually that you probably you understand more as you get older?
 
Ben: Yeah, and there are lots of younger characters in Shakespeare and I always find that it’s really interesting to – as a way into a play with younger people – to look at the play from that character’s perspective. So, for example, in Macbeth the youngest character is Fleance – Banquo’s son – and just looking at the play from that character’s perspective, or in Romeo and Juliet from Romeo and Juliet’s perspective, and just try to find a way of connecting with one or two of those characters that might have some kind of experience in that play that you can relate to, and then the rest of the play kind of is the context for that really. So it’s nice to have that focus as a way in and then explore the play in its entirety a bit later down the line.

Shane: Yeah, and as you were saying Geeta, sometimes also it depends on how it’s taught to us in schools and I think we often put so much pressure on ourselves – as you both said – to understand everything that’s going on and people think, “Oh, it’s only for these intelligent academia and only certain people can understand it” and I think often it’s only when you let that go and kind of think, “I’ll allow myself not to have to understand everything,” you begin then to understand things, because you’re not putting that extra pressure on yourself to think, “What does this word mean?” What does this mean? You can just kind of see what the situation is, what’s happening, and kind of say, “I understand what’s happening there, I don’t have to understand every little nuance of what it is.”
 
Geeta: So much to talk about. I could literally ask you so many questions, and that’s exactly what we’ll be doing. But let’s go to your first song choice of the night for our A Word playlist. You’ve chosen some fantastic songs tonight. We’re going to kick off with Paloma Faith and this is a song chosen by you, Ben. Tell me the song and why you’ve chosen it.
 
Ben: Well, this song is Play Your Own Kind of Music and it’s all about being yourself, finding your own song. There isn’t just one song that’s worth singing, there isn’t one thing that we should all be working towards. We shouldn’t be putting so much pressure on ourselves to fit into something that we feel we might not fit into. We should be authentic, we should be true, we should be ourselves. We should celebrate diversity, life in its many many forms and let’s not beat ourselves up if we don’t fit in. Let’s play our own kind of music.
 
Song lyrics:
 
Nobody can tell you
There's only one song worth singing
They may try and sell you
Cause it hangs them up
To see someone like you
 
But you gotta make your own kind of music
Sing your own special song
Make your own kind of music
Even if nobody else sings along
 
You're gonna be nowhere
The loneliest kind of lonely
It may be rough going
Just to do your thing is the hardest thing to do
 
But you gotta make your own kind of music
Sing your own special song
Make your own kind of music
Even if nobody else sings along
 
So if you cannot take my hand
And if you must be going, I will understand
 
You gotta make your own kind of music
Sing your own special song
Make your own kind of music
Even if nobody else sings along
 
You gotta make your own kind of music
Sing your own kind of song
Make your own kind of music
Even if nobody else sings along
 
You gotta make your own kind of music
Sing your own kind of song
Make your own kind of music
Even if nobody else sings along
 
No, no, no, no
 
Even if nobody else sings along
If nobody else sings along
 
Geeta: That was a great first choice song there for the A Word playlist by Ben who is in the studio with me along with Shane. Both are part of the 1623 theatre company. So you chose Paloma Faith and it was all about celebrating being yourself.
 
Ben: Yeah! Yeah!
 
Geeta: Which is I guess what you’re partly doing with the work that you’re making. So you’re currently working on a show. It’s a show that you have performed, but I know you’re developing it, called Queer Lady M, inspired by Macbeth. Shane, you play the title role.
 
Shane: Yeah.
 
Geeta: In fact, it is a one-person show isn’t it?
 
Shane: Yeah.
 
Geeta: Yeah!
 
Shane: And it kind of explores a lot of my own personal autobiography and then it’s mixed with Lady Macbeth. It kind of explores why we have idols in our lives and how do our idols either help us or hinder us through our growth as we try to find our place in this chaotic little system that is the world. So yeah, it’s about what do we take with us and what really is it that makes us connect with our idols. Lady Macbeth has always been an idol of mine, but then to sit down and kind of really deconstruct that and think why is that? Is it that I see parts of me in her? Is it that I see parts of her in me? Is it that I see parts of her in my mother or my grandmother?
 
Geeta: So did the idea for the show then come from you, essentially, because she’s your idol?
 
Shane: Yeah. So I think three year ago was it?
 
Ben: Yeah.
 
Shane: Three years ago, after working as an actor for years, I decided I wanted a degree; so I relocated to Derby and did a degree at Derby Theatre, which is part of Derby University. And I met Ben. And we were discussing my love for Lady Macbeth. Through conversations over three years we kind of half-explored, you know, in the odd little moment over a cup of tea, meeting up and saying, “Oh, why is this? What’s happening here? What needs to be said about this?
 
Ben: We’ve had a lot of great support from organisations across the midlands. Derby Theatre’s been a really great supporter and I think you talked to Sarah Brigham recently, the artistic director there, (who’s amazing) and a few years ago she gave us the opportunity to run Shakespeare Night, which was a monthly workshop, open to the public. It was a monthly thing and we brought a different play every week, sorry every week not every month, that would be a lot, every week!

Shane: I know haha!
 
Ben: And Shane used to come to all of them so…
 
Shane: I was a Shakespeare geek!
 
Ben: Yeah, in a great way! So yeah and we always used to have conversations at the end of the workshops, so although we were having a workshop on Romeo and Juliet, or Hamlet that particular month, we would always come back to Lady Macbeth at some point and that was when I started asking Shane all these questions; Well what is it about Lady Macbeth’s character, who is much maligned, by a lot of people, she’s quite often seen as the villain.
 
Geeta: Yeah, so you know I think Lady Macbeth is quite a well-known character but if you know you’re not familiar with Macbeth, she is essentially seen as the wife who kind of pushes her husband Macbeth into this power struggle.
 
Shane: Yeah
 
Ben: Yeah and that’s kind of the received wisdom that we’re told when we’re learning the play at school or college and that is in all the study guides as well; she is the villain.
 
Shane: Evil Lady Macbeth, she’s evil and she’s mad! And all these things are associated with this non-person.
 
Ben: But when you actually do look at what she says in the play, she’s far from a villain, she’s very human. And as much as when we first meet her, she’s lost, she’s alone, she’s waiting for news of her husband who’s been away at war for quite a long time, so she’s this lone figure. She receives this letter, and it’s exciting because she’s found out her husband’s a war hero, he’s led the army to victory and there’s hope for the future because there’s been a prediction from three weird sisters because they’ve told him he’s going to be king one day, and Lady Macbeth never talks about herself becoming queen, it’s always about getting Macbeth on the throne and promoting him. So there’s a selflessness to her, and when she starts putting two and two together and knowing that the King’s on his way round to celebrate the victory and that Macbeth’s on his way home as well she thinks; here’s an excellent opportunity, here’s a project. We’re kind of thinking well what’s driving her, what’s making her think; well OK the King's coming to my house tonight, he’s going to be sleeping in one of our bedrooms, I’m the hostess for the evening so I can do anything, you know I can drug his bodyguards and I can get to him and I can kill him and we can frame the bodyguards. But where is that all coming from? And it all comes from this moment where she speaks to spirits, she feels that she alone as a human being, can’t go ahead with this murder, without help from something beyond the everyday. So she calls on these spirits, she says; “Come you spirits, that tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here” (so she’s saying make me not like a woman make me more male), “and fill me from the crown to the toe, top full of direst cruelty”. Well she’s not full of direst cruelty because she feels like she needs to be filled with direst cruelty.
 
Geeta: You know, I have to say Ben, the way you bring that story to life but using everyday words and storytelling, is really captivating, I was just thinking; can I have you for bedtime stories? Maybe not Lady Macbeth, might have a few nightmares.
 
Ben: Maybe something a bit more cheerful!
 
Geeta: Yeah. But you know you tell that story like what have you found? What’s the relevance now to you know you mentioned that gender is an issue there that idea that Lady Macbeth feels she needs to be more masculine, was that important, that gender aspect?
 
Ben: Yeah, that was really that was our starting point in the creation of the show Queer Lady M, that it was something Shane heard on the cartoon that grandma played for him on the VHS tape in the living room one teatime and it was that phrase “unsex me” that really got to you wasn’t it, there’s something about that and then you say in the show you say, “I didn’t really understand what she meant.”
 
Shane: “I didn’t really understand what she meant, but I kind of did.” Yeah it’s that kind of idea of I believe Shakespeare probably puts Lady Macbeth in a very binary world and as much as I believe she does everything out of love for her husband I think sometimes maybe she wouldn’t have gone to such extremes if she’d just been able to fight her battles you know just as a whole person, rather than just being restricted in this world where they just put her as this woman who shouldn’t take up much space and just be nice and be a hostess and look after things so she calls upon these spirits as Ben says and to make her in this binary world of men do this women do this this person works or this person works so she really twists herself trying to fit herself into like this square peg in a round hole I think she’s really pushing herself into this non- sensical box that in the end ultimately obviously makes her very ill psychologically because she’s tried to force herself to be something that she isn’t.
 
Geeta: That she isn’t, yeah. Well I really want to talk more about that idea of gender as well and fluidity but we must go to your first song choice Shane.
 
Shane: Yay!
 
Geeta: So it is, Take Me To Church by Hozier, and why have you chosen this song?
 
Shane: Yeah I just I was thinking back on the last 15 years and I just think that, I come from a family that, well my father’s Irish and so I come from an Irish Travelling background and this song was really prevalent and although Hozier never said it was about same sex relationships or not about same sex relationships he didn’t ever completely say but the video for this song shows the story of a same sex relationship and the abuse that still happens and the hatred that can still be there even though we think our society’s more enlightened there can still be some hatred there against same sex relationships so I kind of think it was very poignant and it was released around the time of the talks around same sex marriages and it’s just poignant really.
 
Geeta: Yep, let’s have a listen!
 
Song lyrics:
 
My lover's got humour
She's the giggle at a funeral
Knows everybody's disapproval
I should've worshiped her sooner
If the Heavens ever did speak
She is the last true mouthpiece
Every Sunday's getting more bleak
A fresh poison each week
"We were born sick", you heard them say it
My church offers no absolutes
She tells me 'worship in the bedroom'
The only heaven I'll be sent to
Is when I'm alone with you
I was born sick, but I love it
Command me to be well
Amen, Amen, Amen
 
Take me to church
I'll worship like a dog at the shrine of your lies
I'll tell you my sins and you can sharpen your knife
Offer me that deathless death
Good God, let me give you my life
 
Take me to church
I'll worship like a dog at the shrine of your lies
I'll tell you my sins and you can sharpen your knife
Offer me that deathless death
Good God, let me give you my life
 
If I'm a pagan of the good times
My lover's the sunlight
To keep the Goddess on my side
She demands a sacrifice
To drain the whole sea
Get something shiny
Something meaty for the main course
That's a fine looking high horse
What you got in the stable?
We've a lot of starving faithful
That looks tasty
That looks plenty
This is hungry work
 
Take me to church
I'll worship like a dog at the shrine of your lies
I'll tell you my sins and you can sharpen your knife
Offer me that deathless death
Good God, let me give you my life
 
Take me to church
I'll worship like a dog at the shrine of your lies
I'll tell you my sins and you can sharpen your knife
Offer me that deathless death
Good God, let me give you my life
 
No masters or kings when the ritual begins
There is no sweeter innocence than our gentle sin
In the madness and soil of that sad earthly scene
Only then I am human
Only then I am clean
Amen, Amen, Amen
 
Take me to church
I'll worship like a dog at the shrine of your lies
I'll tell you my sins and you can sharpen your knife
Offer me that deathless death
Good God, let me give you my life
 
Take me to church
I'll worship like a dog at the shrine of your lies
I'll tell you my sins and you can sharpen your knife
Offer me that deathless death
Good God, let me give you my life
 
Geeta: You’re listening to BBC Radio Leicester. Ben, you are part of the 1623 theatre company. Why 1623, what’s the reason?
 
Ben: Well, Shakespeare’s complete(ish) works were published in the year 1623, and if it wasn’t for that complete works that was put together 7 years after Shakespeare died, by 2 of the actors in his theatre company, we wouldn’t have most of his plays.
 
Geeta: So it’s a pretty important date then in the world of Shakespeare?
 
Ben: Yeeeeaaah!
 
Geeta: Well, we’ve been chatting about your show Queer Lady M, which you’re devising currently. Shane you are in the title role and Shane you are a gender fluid actor.
 
Shane: Yeah
 
Geeta: And I wanted to ask you how you feel that is represented currently on stage and screen, do you feel like you are able to go for roles, do you feel yourself represented, how are you finding it at the moment?
 
Shane: I’d say that yeah I’m a gender fluid actor so I feel a fluidity within my sex and I do feel that often if I was to go for an audition it would be predominantly obviously a it would have to be a male person because of how I speak it would have to be a camp male person and stereotypically a campo gay person and that is typically how I have been cast in that past if I have auditioned and I find that I am, that it’s not always appropriate I think to label people in a way that it hinders them playing different roles. I think often a male or female or gender fluid actor could play any part I believe, so…
 
Geeta: And that’s interesting because there’s been a real debate around that hasn’t there, I think it was back in maybe June last year when Scarlett Johansen pulled out of playing a trans character because there was criticism that as a straight woman she wouldn’t be able to play that in the appropriate way and there was a lot of dialogue around that with different actors views on it and I think Cate Blanchett came out because I think she played a lesbian in the film Carol and for her she believes that that’s not the case. And what do you think about that Ben that if you haven’t personally experienced it you can’t perform it or for an actor you know…where do you stand?
 
Ben: Hmmm I think it’s very specific to each actor, so if an actor is offered a trans role and isn’t trans themselves, then they might question why they’ve been cast, have I been cast because I’m a big box office name? Have I been cast because of a certain look or of my past experience as an actor, what is it about that specific role, if you haven’t been cast because there’s an authenticity there, then there’s a problem I think. If you’re not a trans person but you’re an ally of trans people and you know a lot of people and you try to understand and you advocate and you support and you’re then offered a trans role you could go and discuss that role with your trans friends, colleagues, family members and then make an informed decision about whether that’s something you can do authentically in order to tell that story from a place of integrity. If you’re taking a role because you think its quite a trendy thing and it’s quite in at the moment then that’s the wrong reason.
 
Shane: I think it’s best, it’s a thing about being best for the job as well and as Ben’s said it’s on their presentation so if a trans person chooses for example, because this is the line we’re talking of, if a trans person is best for the job then they should have the role. If a non-trans actor is understanding and understands the path there is best for the role then I don’t think they should be discriminated against because they’re not trans.
 
Ben: And then there is also as you were saying Geeta there’s also representation, there’s a great theatre company called Milk Presents, who are associates of Derby Theatre, and they’ve toured all over the country and internationally and they’ve got a great show called Bullish, which is all about trans identity and all the cast are trans themselves, so there is an element of their own story being told as part of the show so there’s a real integrity and there’s a real sense of it all coming from first hand experience and it’s all authentic and real, yet it’s a fictional story that’s being told as the overarching story. So you see I can’t imagine that story being performed by a cast that’s not trans, because they wouldn’t bring that authenticity.
 
Shane: Yeah I think they bring a sense of humanity to it, that pure understanding of it like you say when we understand this feeling that we’re talking about.
 
Geeta: It’s quite a complex debate isn’t it? So, we must keep up with music, we’ve got some lovely choices. Ben, I’m going to come over to you because one of the lovely things about your company 1623 is that you really want to bring Shakespeare to people of all backgrounds, particularly people who might not be interested in Shakespeare so you go to lots of locations. So, this song choice that you have chosen, One Day Like This, Elbow, I believe is connected to Glastonbury and a performance there.
 
Ben: That’s right yeah! For a number of years we went to Glastonbury and performed Shakespeare in our wellies in the thick mud most years! And it was all about engaging the festival goers there with Shakespeare throughout the day in different fun and exciting ways. So one year we took a show called Midsummer Magic and we took Titania the fairy Queen and all her naughty fairies and the audience were coming up with all sorts of ideas for the fairies to entertain the fairy Queen. We’ve also done the Shakespeare Workout there in 2012.
 
Geeta: The Shakespeare Workout! We’ll have to save that for another time because I have so many questions!
 
Ben: Yeah! And this particular year there was about 8 of us, our team, 8 artists, and in the evening we all went to the pyramid stage and we were all there together amongst thousands of festival goers, artists of lots of different backgrounds, lots of different cultures. And the sun was setting, and we were roaring this all singing together and it felt like we were all singing with one voice and he was wonderful at working the crowd and getting us all to sing together.
 
Song lyrics:
 
Drinking in the morning sun
Blinking in the morning sun
Shaking off the heavy one
Heavy like a loaded gun
 
What made me behave that way?
Using words I never say
I can only think it must be love
Oh, anyway, it's looking like a beautiful day
 
Someone tell me how I feel
It's silly wrong but vivid right
Oh, kiss me like the final meal
Yeah, kiss me like we die tonight
 
Cause holy cow, I love your eyes
And only now I see the light
Yeah, lying with me half awake
Oh, anyway, it's looking like a beautiful day
 
When my face is chamois-creased
If you think I'll wink, I did
Laugh politely at repeats
Yeah, kiss me when my lips are thin
 
Cause holy cow, I love your eyes
And only now I see you like
Yeah, lying with me half awake
Stumbling over what to say
Well, anyway, it's looking like a beautiful day
 
Throw those curtains wide!
One day like this a year'd see me right
Throw those curtains wide!
One day like this a year'd we'll sing it right
 
Geeta: One Day Like This, Elbow. Ben Spiller chose that song. Ben is the artistic director of 1623 theatre company that’s really inspired by Shakespeare. Ben, what a fantastic song choice there. I can really … you were describing how you performed at Glastonbury with your theatre company bringing Shakespeare to life in different ways and you all went along and saw Elbow perform that song. I guess, I was just thinking, that is the thing about theatre. And you’re in a one-person show with Queer Lady M, Shane, but you’re still a team aren’t you? There’s this sense of you’re never on your own are you?
 
Shane: No. I mean, we have a great team. There’s obviously myself and Ben. And Kitty Winter who did the movement, we have Chris Lydon who did the music and Adam who did the sound and Tim the designer. And lots of other people who stepped in and helped out along the way. Leo from Milk Presents, and Sarah Brigham from Derby Theatre and people from everywhere just all kind of coming in and saying, “Let’s look at this.”
 
Geeta: You paint this picture, it’s all very collaborative, and you know clearly it takes more than one person but Shane it is a one-person show.
 
Shane: It is a one-person show!
 
Geeta: So what’s that like? And how long is the show?
 
Shane: The show is just under an hour.
 
Geeta: OK.
 
Shane: And I think, I don’t know. I think it’s great for me. I really like it. I kind of at the beginning of the show I welcome everybody, the audience, in. And that kind of helps me to just be you know let’s all kind of settle together. And we’re going to explore this incident now, this story, about my life and Lady Macbeth’s life and how they bang together. And at what points do we meet. And I really like it. I love working with other actors but sometimes when you’re on your own you kind of think, “OK, you’re on your own. No pressure, but sometimes you can feel a little bit freer because nobody else is relying on you. It’s just you relying on you.
 
Geeta: And you were saying as well, you know, that as a result, like, if you do fluff a line it doesn’t matter. [Laughs]
 
Shane: And then Ben has a meltdown in the corner and it’s great.
 
Ben: It’s great for Shane!
 
Shane: [Laughs] But when it comes to Shakespeare’s lines, I’m the world’s worst person at changing Shakespeare’s words and going, “That’s kind of what he meant, isn’t it?”
 
Geeta: Well, you were saying that it’s as much about the sentiment as the words. Well, I think this is a really good point to play your last song choice, Shane. We’re going to say goodbye to you. You’ve been such brilliant guests on the show. Thank you so much for coming on.
 
Shane: Thank you for having us.
 
Geeta: I know that you’ll be bringing Queer Lady M back to Attenborough Arts in the autumn.
 
Ben: Yes, Attenborough Arts in Leicester. An amazing venue run by Michaela Butter and John Kirby. Such an exciting, vibrant programme of artistic workshops and performances, a gallery of wonderful work from all over the world. Right here in the heart of Leicester. And a great supporter of 1623 and many other companies from across the midlands.
 
Geeta: Well, we look forward to seeing you there. And so the song that we’re going to end with is one of my personal favourites, Shane. Noah and the Whale, Life Goes On. Why did you choose this song?
 
Shane: I’m glad you said that title as well, as I would have been like, “L I F E G”
 
Geeta: I know! I thought I’d just go for the easy option there.
 
Shane: My family is very scattered. We live all over the world. So, ten years ago we made a conscious effort to all get together. I have four brothers and a sister who came and their husbands and wives and children, and my mum and dad. And we rented a villa in Spain. And my brother had to do a playlist and this was one that I chose for the playlist. And we all kind of listened to it so much and I really like the ethos of the song, of it doesn’t really matter let’s just live our life. If it crumbles a bit that’s OK but it goes on. Let’s, at the end of the day, when it’s our time, let’s go, “It’s OK, I’ve done it all, I’ve done what I needed to do, I’m happy.”
 
Geeta: Well I’m happy that you came on the show. And here’s Life Goes On by Noah and the Whale.
 
Song lyrics:
 
Lisa likes brandy and the way it hits her lips
She's a rock 'n' roll survivor with pendulum hips
She's got deep brown eyes
That've seen it all
Working at a nightclub that was called The Avenue
The bar men used to call her "Little Lisa, Looney Tunes"
She went down on almost anyone
From the hard time living 'til the Chelsea days
From when her hair was sweet blonde 'til the day it turned grey

She said:
L.I.F.E.G.O.E.S.O.N.
You've got more than money and sense, my friend
You've got heart and you're going your own way
L.I.F.E.G.O.E.S.O.N.

What you don't have now will come back again
You've got heart and you're going your own way
Some people wear their history like a map on their face
And Joey was an artist just living out of case
But his best work was his letters home
Extended works of fiction about imaginary success
The chorus girls in neon were his closest things to friends
But to a writer, the truth is no big deal
From the hard time living to the sleepless nights
And the black and blue body from the weekend fights
 
He'd say:
L.I.F.E.G.O.E.S.O.N.
You've got more than money and sense, my friend
You've got heart and you're going your own way
L.I.F.E.G.O.E.S.O.N.
 
What you don't have now will come back again
You've got heart and you're going your own way
On my last night on earth, I want to look to the sky
Just breathe in the air and blink in the light
On my last night on earth, I'll pay a high price
To have no regrets and be done with my life
 
L.I.F.E.G.O.E.S.O.N.
You've got more than money and sense, my friend
You've got heart and you're going your own way
 
L.I.F.E.G.O.E.S.O.N.
What you don't have now will come back again
You've got heart and you're going your own way
 

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